Sti

Calculator

How risky is getting frisky?

Sexually transmitted infections (STIs) have been around for thousands of years, and are still a serious health issue in the present day. While treatments have been developed for the majority of STIs, and many are now completely curable, there is still a clear and present risk of catching one if you’re not careful.

Like any transferable illness, STIs can fluctuate in how prevalent they are in different areas. They rely on person-to-person sexual contact in order to infect someone new, so infection rates tend to be pretty low compared to other infectious viruses such as the flu. However, if you’re not careful and you let passion cloud your better judgement, you could well end up with an unpleasant surprise.

Sexual health is important to us. We believe that people should be able to enjoy their sex lives in a safe and pleasurable way, without fear of infection. With this in mind, we’ve compiled some expert advice so that you know how to best protect yourself from STIs, and if you are unfortunate to catch one, the best course of action for you to take.

We’ve also looked at STI rates across the country to create the STI calculator, which will tell you how prevalent different STIs are in your area, so you know how at-risk you actually are.

The STI risk calculator

To see a breakdown of the STI risk in your area, simply select a location.

Results

In your area the …

All new STI

diagnosis rate is...

(per 100,000 people)

Syphilis

diagnostic rate is...

(per 100,000 people)

Gonorrhoea

diagnosis rate is...

(per 100,000 people)

Chlamydia

diagnosis rate is...

(per 100,000 people)

Genital warts

diagnosis rate is...

(per 100,000 people)

Genital herpes

diagnostic rate is...

(per 100,000 people)

New HIV

diagnostic rate (aged 15+) is...

(per 100,000 people)

HIV

diagnosed prevalence rate (aged 15-59) is...

(per 100,000 people)

The UK STI diagnostic rates by locations

(per 100,000 people)

Rank

Location

Region

Syphilis
diagnostic
rate

Gonorrhoea
diagnostic rate

Chlamydia
diagnostic
rate

Genital
warts
diagnostic
rate

Genital
herpes
diagnostic
rate

New HIV
diagnosis rate
(aged 15+)

HIV diagnosed
prevalence rate
(aged 15-59)
per 1,000
people

All new STI
diagnosis rate

Protecting yourself from STIs

Nobody wants to get an STI, but you shouldn’t let the fear of catching one stop you from enjoying a rich and fulfilling sex life. To help keep you safe while you’re getting intimate, we’ve put together some expert advice.

How to avoid
contracting an STI

The best thing to do is to always use protection. This means using condoms and dental dams to prevent direct contact between each other’s genitals. You should also keep in mind that protection should be extended to anybody that comes into contact with someone else’s genital area, and that sex toys should be washed thoroughly with soap and water between uses.

You can also limit the risk by not having sex with multiple partners, and you should feel comfortable asking whether they have been tested since they last had sex. By first volunteering this information about yourself and when you were last tested, you can make this question less invasive to your potential partner.

Getting yourself tested

If you are sexually active, especially if you are not in a monogamous relationship, then you should get yourself tested for STIs on a regular basis, ideally after each sexual encounter. By catching infections earlier, they can be treated more effectively and there is less chance of developing additional health complications.

The NHS recommends getting tested for STIs if you experience any of the following symptoms:

Unusual discharge from the vagina, penis or anus

Pain when peeing

Lumps or skin growths around the genitals or anus

A rash

Unusual vaginal bleeding

Itchy genitals or anus

Blisters and sores around the genitals or anus

You should also get yourself tested if your partner experiences any of the above symptoms.

Additionally, as some STIs such as HIV have no symptoms, you should arrange for an STI check-up if you have had unprotected sex and are worried about your sexual health.

What to do if you
catch an STI

If you test positive for an STI then don’t panic, many STIs are curable and those that aren’t can be treated so that you can carry on living life as normal. Here are some guidelines for what to do if you receive a positive result:

Upon receiving your diagnosis, you should immediately seek medical advice. The sooner infections are treated, the better for your health.

Avoid sex until you have been treated. This will prevent you from passing the infection on to anyone else.

Contact anyone who you have had sexual contact with since your last STI test, informing them of your diagnosis and advising them to get tested.

Methodology

We wanted to create a tool whereby someone can look up the rates of different STIs in their area, making them aware of the prevalence of different STIs in their locality. To do this, we used data from Public Health England, which gave us the diagnoses rates of multiple STIs including syphilis, genital herpes, HIV and more.

This tool was then combined with expert information and guidance on how to protect yourself from STIs. Using the NHS website as a source, we compiled advice on how to have safe sex, when you should get tested, and what to do if you receive a positive diagnosis for an STI.