The UK’s most common sex dreams (and what they mean!)

If you’ve ever woken up confused, surprised, or maybe even excited by a dream you just had, you’re not alone. Not only are sex dreams incredibly common, there are certain themes which appear time and time again.

To find out more, we surveyed over 2,000 adults from across the UK, to see what’s on our minds when we go to sleep!

What are we dreaming about?

According to our survey, 90% of Brits have experienced a sexual dream at least once in their life, with women (91%) slightly more likely to have them than men (89%).

When asked about the most popular scenarios, having an orgasm came out on top, with 72% of Brits saying they’d climaxed in a dream. Meanwhile, 49% of Brits have broken up with a partner in a dream.

Have you ever dreamt of any of the following scenarios?

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Who are we dreaming about?

Our survey found that 58% of Brits have had a romantic dream about a current partner, making them the most common person to dream about. At the other end of the scale, politicians are the least likely to appear in our sex dreams, with only 8% of Brits admitting to this.

46% of people in our survey who identified as homosexual said they’d had a sex dream about someone of the opposite sex, while only 22% of people who identified as heterosexual said they’d had a sex dream about someone of the same sex.

Have you ever had a sexual dream about any of the following people?

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How are we reacting to our dreams?

While many of us will forget our dreams within moments of waking up, for others they can have a much bigger impact. Almost half of the people in our survey said they’d felt attracted to someone after dreaming about them, with 36% actually telling the person they’d featured in a sex dream.

According to our research, 20% of Brits have argued with a partner based on something that happened in a dream, while 10% have taken it a step further and broken up!

Have you ever done any of the following after having a sexual dream?

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What do our dreams mean?

If you’ve woken up confused by a sex dream you might have had, it’s perfectly natural to want to know more. 32% of the people we spoke to said they’ve searched online to try and find the meaning behind a dream they’ve had.

To help shine a little light on the matter, here are some common meanings behind some of the most popular sex dreams.

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"All of these scenarios count among the most common sex dreams people have, even without the stress of the pandemic. Because of the undue stress we’ve all been under, you may have experienced more intense sexual dreams or dreams that you didn't use to have pre-pandemic. There can be any number of reasons behind our dreams, but try not to worry about the content. Your erotic subconscious is infinite, and can often present scenarios that you’d never think about doing in real life, and that's ok! Sometimes dreams can be your subconscious mind's way of processing difficult emotions, while other times they can be a sign of something that isn't being expressed or a need that's not being met."

"For example, if you haven't been able to see your partner or have sex, date, or engage in other activities for a longer period of time, it's no surprise that your dreams may be more intense! If you search online for the meaning behind dreams, you can find all sorts of answers that may confirm or deny your fears, so don't worry too much about what they mean and if they’re a prophecy of doom to come."
"Just because you're having a dream about cheating on your partner, being unable to perform, or breaking up, it doesn't mean you want it to happen! You may be dreaming about being unable to perform if you haven't been able to see anybody for a while, or it can be a way of your subconscious saying you feel powerless. Or if you're dreaming about having sex with multiple people, it doesn't necessarily mean that you want to pursue it in waking life, it could just be a curiosity of what it's like to sleep with others."

"There’s nothing wrong with anything you dream about, so try not to over-analyse them or worry too much. On the other hand, if you feel excited or turned on by a dream when you wake up, take some time to feel into and explore what that means for you. Sometimes erotic dreams can provide exciting inspiration, depending on how it makes you feel. Remember, the sexual subconscious is infinite and it can be a doorway to exploring more of who you are. You aren't a pervert, a weird person, or a bad person for having unusual sex dreams, you're just human!”

Lucy Rowett, Sex and Relationship Coach

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Based on a survey of 2,005 UK based adults, aged 16 and above, completed during November 2020